UK Crop Circles May 2016 [hj]

This is the first in what I am hoping will be a series of monthly posts as the season progresses. We will not be announcing each new circle as it appears, we simply do not have the time or resources for that, but intend through these round-up articles to provide some insight into the season as it develops. Photo by Philippe Ullens / Avebury Henge Shop except where indicated.

The 2016 season was a little late in starting, with no circles reported in April. The first circle to appear, however, at Hill Barn, West Overton, Wiltshire, on 5 May was a most pleasing season opener.2016.05.23_12.52.29_-_Philippe_Ullens

It is a shame, however, that a known local circle maker decided to visit it and post his ground shots all over the internet the day it was found. I am not saying that he made it, but his name is now forever associated with it which tarnishes the circle and diminishes its power.

The next three circles – at East Field, Wiltshire, 11 May, Avebury, Wiltshire, 15 May, and Silbury Hill, Wiltshire, 28 May, were much simpler affairs. They do, however, bear some analysis.

2016.05.23_13.01.54_-_Philippe_Ullens

2016.05.23_13.06.16_-_Philippe_Ullens

2016.06.02_12.49.33_-_Lucy_Pringle

This return to much simpler designs is notable, and not for the reason put forward by Andrew Pyrka on his Crop Circle Wisdom Facebook page –

CCW 29 May old school designs

Not everybody is as lazy as you are when it comes to making circles, Mr Pyrka. I think this “return to old school designs” happened for a different reason.

The progression from single circle, to ringed circle, to double-ringed circle, was picked up by many, as it seemed to echo the circles’ early history. I have not seen it noted anywhere, however, that all these circles appeared in “prime circles real estate” Wiltshire locations. Locations where previously farmers have been very antagonistic and have cut circles, and not without good reason (please see previous articles on this blog). Perhaps these 2016 circles are more a “testing of the water”? Small and simple designs, to see how the farmer would react? A building of bridges? A hand extended? One can only speculate.

Hugh Janus