Author Archives: poppy amersham

Hold On A Minute… # 3

Back in the day when Crop Circle Nirvana was a website rather than a blog, we had a feature named ‘Hold On A Minute’, featuring some of our favourite ‘you what, mate? What in hell’s name are you on about!?’ cerealogical moments. You can read the original posts here and here. Though it sometimes seems as if our whole blog has turned into a ‘you what?’ catalogue, we’ve decided to resurrect the feature. Here are a few things that have caught our eye recently. The first is courtesy of Red Collie, aka Horace Drew, the second from Randell Sarneel. If anybody can explain what in sweet baby Jeez’ name either of these two gentlemen is on about, we’d be grateful.
 

 

Manton Drove, Wiltshire, 24 May 2015

A new circle has just been reported at Manton Drove, near Marlborough in Wiltshire, and we rather like it.

With a dreary lack of surprise, however, RACCF and CCPMT – which in many respects are the same page – have given it a trouncing. Which tells you a very significant thing. RACCF and CCPMT only like crop circles which were made by them or by their friends. You can be sure that any circle which they put the boot into is one they know nothing about.

For RACCF, irony is something people do to their clothes in between washing them and hanging them up (though we kinda doubt much ironing goes on in the Williams household). Yes, it is a “same old, same old… loop of never ending tales”, but one coming from them and not from the fields. There’s nothing wrong with this circle. It’s fine. Sure, it’s bitty in places, but that’s immature barley for you. Sure, the four outer circles look like they’re wrongly spaced at first but with a 13-pointed star and four circles, maybe it’s deliberate. It’s very clear that RACCF don’t know the creator of this formation or their intentions, so how do they know that was not the case? As we said above, RACCF don’t like circles they know nothing about (and this hasn’t stopped them making wild guess accusations as to where this circle may have come from). RACCF especially don’t like circles in Wiltshire they know nothing about. Both these factors should, in themselves, be a reason to look at the circle more closely; i.e. it had nothing to do with them or their extended menagerie.”Same old, same old… loop of never ending tales” also aptly describes the CCPMT post, which is merely a tired rehearsal of their usual “Steve A, money, Charles Mallett, cash tills, Lucy Pringle, ker ching, Monique coming over here and stealing our circles” spiel and which says precisely zero about the circle itself. These delusions are those of CCPMT themselves (and RACCF for that matter) and bear little relation to what is happening in the fields.
Move along, nothing new to see here. Except for those who, ya know, might actually want to just look at the circle, which is new, and which we rather like. A good circle for barley, and a good season opener. But maybe that’s just us, liking as we do to look at circles on their own merits and without a raft of attendant and bogus biases.

The Protected Connector

We’ve always found Report A Crop Circle Formation’s and Crop Circles The People The Mystery The Truth’s ‘turn over tables in temples’ attitude somewhat at odds with the selectiveness of their targets. We were therefore very interested earlier in the summer when Crop Circles Anonymous asked CCPMT why The Crop Circle Connector were exempt from their criticism, despite the Connector clearly having profited from crop circles (as an aside, we’d remind you that RACCF and CCPMT still insist they have no connection, despite sharing the same attitudes, allies, enemies, outlook, and unique linguistic style. We don’t believe them; whether you do is up to you).

Here’s Crop Circles Anonymous’ post:

This was. we’d imagine, prompted by this post by CCPMT on May 5 2014:

  
A contrary state of affairs indeed and CCA were, we feel, justified in their questioning. The responses were wisely captured and preserved by CCA, as CCPMT have a liberal deletion policy with regard to posts and comments on their page:
 A further and most curious comment on the matter was made by the “nothing whatsoever to do with CCPMT” RACCF a little later:
So effectively what these two pages are saying is that, despite The Crop Circle Connector embodying everything they so vehemently criticise others on the crop circle scene for, they won’t say anything because the Connector are mates. At least they’re honest about it, and don’t even appear to be denying it once you wade through the shoddy English and obfuscation. This does of course make a sham of their ‘we oppose crop circle deception and profiteering’ stance, but there you go; they said it, not us.

Cherrington, Gloucestershire, 27 July 2014

Our favourite circle of the season, and one that we know was much-loved by many people.

Even the farmer loved this one, despite his initial misgivings. The story featured in The Daily Mail on 5 August 2014 and is well-worth repeating, if only because it’s heartening to see a farmer appreciative of a circle that appears on his land, especially in view of the anger of many Wiltshire farmers in recent years. Read it here – below we have included screen captures of the whole article, partly for convenience and partly in case the link goes down:

 

We were especially impressed with the fact that The Daily Mail of all people acknowledged that the pentagram is a harmonious symbol and not a satanic one. Unlike Andrew Pyrka and Report A Crop Circle Formation, who went all fire and brimstone, hell and damnation, over this circle:

Yeah, right, Andrew, of course. Now go and take your meds.

Ignoring the ring of code – which has yet to be deciphered – perhaps the most striking and innovative thing about this design is the fact that the pattern is entirely within the lay rather than the conventional ‘alternating standing and flattened bits’ style. Yes, there have been woven circles before – indeed there were other woven circles in 2014 – but Cherrington takes it to another level entirely. Though few people seemed to pick up on it when Cherrington appeared, there is one particular example we can think of where this has been done before.

This circle appeared below the Hackpen Hill white horse in August 2013. From a distance it merely looks like a small and unremarkable ringed circle.

Hackpen Hill, 11 August 2013. Note the white horse to the right in the photo above, and – just to the left of the circle – the ghost of the Hackpen Hill cubes formation of August 2012, which was in the same field. Hackpen Hill photos above and below by Janet Ossebaard.

A closer look, however, reveals a striking hexagram lay.

 

This was one of those circles which was for the most part neglected when it appeared, but which was loved by all who took the time to appreciate it, especially those who visited. Its qualities take effort on the part of the participant. Perhaps that is the message of these two circles; get to know them, appreciate the detail, rather than just give the aerials a quick glance and a ‘yeah that’s nice’ or ‘fail’.

We’ve not seen anybody else link these two circles, though to our minds the relationship is obvious. Cherrington 2014 is Hackpen Hill 2013 taken to the next level.

Now That’s What I Call Crop Circles 2014

Our annual pick of the best UK circles of the season.

Hod Hill, Dorset, 1 June 2014. Photo by Steve Alexander. There were a number of circles in Dorset this year. This one is our favourite; we found the others rather derivative of past seasons, all bells and whistles and little substance, albeit very well-made for the most part. It’s unfortunate that their makers felt the need to flaunt it all over the Facebook crop circle pages, leaving nobody in any doubt as to who they were.

Popham, Hampshire, 21 June 2014. Photo by Lucy Pringle. Comparatively simple compared to some of these designs, but we like it.

Wilmington, East Sussex, 3 July 2014. Photo by Steve Alexander.

Charlton, Wiltshire, 8 July 2014. Photo by Lucy Pringle.

Forest Hill, Wiltshire, 15 July 2014. Photo by Mr Gyro.

Cherrington, Gloucestershire, 27 July 2014. Our favourite of the season. Photo by Mr Gyro.

Ansty, Warwickshire, 16 August 2014. Photo by Steve Alexander.

There Goes The Neighbourhood

We’re back on the croppie scene, after another hugely successful absence. In some respects it seems like another world compared to ten years ago, in others nothing has changed. The last few seasons have been most colourful, which we intend to cover in due course as we bring the blog up to date.

In the meantime, we’re very pleased to welcome Miles Challett to our team as a staff writer. Some of you may know Miles from his forum and Facebook posts. He patrols the dark underbelly of croppiedom so that we don’t have to. For convenience, Miles has copied all historic posts from his own blog to this one and you can read them all below. We hope to feature other guest writers in due course also; watch this space.

The Boycott That Never Was

You may well have heard talk of an alleged boycott of Wiltshire fields by circle makers this season – indeed we have touched on it in other posts. The following was posted by Andrew Edwards on the Report A Crop Circle Formation Exposed Facebook page. As we had suspected, a look at the figures clearly demonstrates that all boycott talk was hot air. A salutary lesson; ignore those who shout loudest and look at the actual data.

”In MWs latest rant he makes a statement that if you were to compare the number of circles in and out of Wiltshire then we would see the effect of his ‘ban’ especially early in the season. So I have done this for every day of the year and compared it with the yearly average for every year since 1980. I have plotted the percentage of UK circles in and out of Wiltshire as a percentage of the total number of UK crop circles that year. Obviously this year is not over yet so I have taken the total to be that as of today.
Add caption
The dashed lines are the averages, the solid lines is this year and the filled colours are the standard deviation (68% of years fall within this area). The red is the percentage of circles in Wiltshire and blue is the percentage elsewhere.As you can see that although the percentage of crop circles in Wiltshire is lower than the average (and outside is higher) they are both well within the population standard deviation indicating that there is nothing weird about this years distribution. An interesting observation is that since 2007 most of the years (2010 being the exception) have been way off the average, outside the standard deviation with a strong skewness towards circles within Wiltshire.
In fact removing the years later than 2007 from the average this year is almost exactly the same as it.
If anything this year has been a return to the norm.”
– Andrew Edwards