Category Archives: 2015 Season

Now That’s What I Call Crop Circles 2015 [HJ]

Our “out in the fields” correspondent Hugh Janus presents the CCN annual round-up of what we consider the best of the season’s circles in the UK. Photos by Steve Alexander except where indicated.

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Uffcott, Wiltshire, 21 June 2015.

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Redlynch, Somerset, June 2015.

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Clearbury Ring, Odstock, Wiltshire, 7 July 2015. Our favourite of what our friends at The Croppie dubbed the ‘big spiky thing’ series.

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Rollright, Oxfordshire, 15 July 2015. We also particuarly liked the small ringed circle that appeared in the same field on the same night.

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Maiden Castle, Dorset, 28 July 2015.

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Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire, 8 August 2015

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Fox Hill, Liddington, Wiltshire, 9 August 2015. Amply demonstrating that a crop circle doesn’t need to have complex geometry to be beautiful.

Hugh Janus

Chasing The Crop Circles

A short new documentary featuring some of the early 2015 season circles. We love documentaries like this, croppies exploring and enjoying the circles on their own terms, some theories thrown in but no ugliness.

Rose Wyrdness

2015.06.22_19.26.36_-_Steve_AlexanderCharles Mallett interviews Spanish tourists regarding experiences in the 22 June 2015 Uffcott circle, including seeing tornados (within the circle; we wonder if it was more a “dust devil” than an actual tornado) and a strange “energy barrier” / wall. It should be noted perhaps that these events took place at the end of July 2015, after the circle had been cut, which doesn’t make them any less interesting.

Photo of Uffcott circle by Steve Alexander.

Manton Drove, Wiltshire, 24 May 2015

A new circle has just been reported at Manton Drove, near Marlborough in Wiltshire, and we rather like it.

With a dreary lack of surprise, however, RACCF and CCPMT – which in many respects are the same page – have given it a trouncing. Which tells you a very significant thing. RACCF and CCPMT only like crop circles which were made by them or by their friends. You can be sure that any circle which they put the boot into is one they know nothing about.

For RACCF, irony is something people do to their clothes in between washing them and hanging them up (though we kinda doubt much ironing goes on in the Williams household). Yes, it is a “same old, same old… loop of never ending tales”, but one coming from them and not from the fields. There’s nothing wrong with this circle. It’s fine. Sure, it’s bitty in places, but that’s immature barley for you. Sure, the four outer circles look like they’re wrongly spaced at first but with a 13-pointed star and four circles, maybe it’s deliberate. It’s very clear that RACCF don’t know the creator of this formation or their intentions, so how do they know that was not the case? As we said above, RACCF don’t like circles they know nothing about (and this hasn’t stopped them making wild guess accusations as to where this circle may have come from). RACCF especially don’t like circles in Wiltshire they know nothing about. Both these factors should, in themselves, be a reason to look at the circle more closely; i.e. it had nothing to do with them or their extended menagerie.”Same old, same old… loop of never ending tales” also aptly describes the CCPMT post, which is merely a tired rehearsal of their usual “Steve A, money, Charles Mallett, cash tills, Lucy Pringle, ker ching, Monique coming over here and stealing our circles” spiel and which says precisely zero about the circle itself. These delusions are those of CCPMT themselves (and RACCF for that matter) and bear little relation to what is happening in the fields.
Move along, nothing new to see here. Except for those who, ya know, might actually want to just look at the circle, which is new, and which we rather like. A good circle for barley, and a good season opener. But maybe that’s just us, liking as we do to look at circles on their own merits and without a raft of attendant and bogus biases.

The Boycott That Never Was

You may well have heard talk of an alleged boycott of Wiltshire fields by circle makers this season – indeed we have touched on it in other posts. The following was posted by Andrew Edwards on the Report A Crop Circle Formation Exposed Facebook page. As we had suspected, a look at the figures clearly demonstrates that all boycott talk was hot air. A salutary lesson; ignore those who shout loudest and look at the actual data.

”In MWs latest rant he makes a statement that if you were to compare the number of circles in and out of Wiltshire then we would see the effect of his ‘ban’ especially early in the season. So I have done this for every day of the year and compared it with the yearly average for every year since 1980. I have plotted the percentage of UK circles in and out of Wiltshire as a percentage of the total number of UK crop circles that year. Obviously this year is not over yet so I have taken the total to be that as of today.
Add caption
The dashed lines are the averages, the solid lines is this year and the filled colours are the standard deviation (68% of years fall within this area). The red is the percentage of circles in Wiltshire and blue is the percentage elsewhere.As you can see that although the percentage of crop circles in Wiltshire is lower than the average (and outside is higher) they are both well within the population standard deviation indicating that there is nothing weird about this years distribution. An interesting observation is that since 2007 most of the years (2010 being the exception) have been way off the average, outside the standard deviation with a strong skewness towards circles within Wiltshire.
In fact removing the years later than 2007 from the average this year is almost exactly the same as it.
If anything this year has been a return to the norm.”
– Andrew Edwards